Kingston Predator 16GB (2x8GB) 1866 MHz DDR3 RAM/Memory Kit Review (KHX18C9T2K2/16X) - Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts


Kingston's Predator series held its own in the benchmarks, was easy to OC, and stable up to 2133 MHz without applying over the spec'd 1.65V. The design is sleek with a blue accent, following several other Kingston HyperX product lines.  The most prominent potential drawback is the large-profile heatsink, and you need to watch out for large CPU coolers or smaller motherboards as the heatsink may get in the way, at least blocking the innermost DIMM slot.

 

Kingston Predator 1886 Memory Kit

The overclock process took some time, as overclocking RAM usually does, and the sticks were not as willing to secede much in the timing department. In the end, we were able to acheive our 2133 MHz overclock by dropping the timings to CL11 and a conservative 1.65V, which is more than fine for an everyday overclock. The XMP profile did a good job of a quick overclock, with low timings and high stability without having to fiddle with anything, and gets you about 2/3 of the way to the best overclock we could achieve, which is convenient and ultimately what you pay for in the 1866 MHz kit. The high capacity of this 16GB kit allows for plenty of flexibilty in multitasking and RAMDisk/cache use if you want that extra speed boost.

 

The sticks go for about $145 (Newegg) so they are by far not the cheapest option.  By comparison, the Patriot Viper 3 Intel Extreme Master's 16GB kit has very similar specs, is also hand-picked and tested, but with a lighter and lower profile design, and overclocked almost as well, at a price of about $100 (and even has a similar blue/black color scheme).  The edgy and very nice heatspreader really has to sell you for the extra $50 out of pocket, but Kingston's proven reliability and customer support alongside the kit's high performance may justify the extra bucks for your rig.

 

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# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 08:21
These sticks are based on Hynix CFR 2Gb ICs and should have way more headroom, at least DDR3-2400 11-13-12.
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-26 08:28
Quoting Sabishii Hito:
These sticks are based on Hynix CFR 2Gb ICs and should have way more headroom, at least DDR3-2400 11-13-12.


Even the best chips down have some "down-binned" parts come off the line for the lower frequency kits. But appreciate the feedback, and I'll give it another shot for you (we were unsuccessful through several hours of trial-and-error through seemingly endless timing combinations at 2400 MHz). It is very possible we have one unlucky DIMM holding the kit back. Appreciate it and we will report back if we get something to stick this time! These also deserve a discussion of the Hynix chips, so thanks for that as well.
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 11:04
Hmm, those buggers might need some more volts slapped in 'em! Although Hynix doesn't seem to scale much over 1.75v
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 12:21
Yeah these ICs, when going for clocks over 2000 like the timings to be tRCD=tRP+1=CAS+ 2
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-26 12:28
Quoting Sabishii Hito:
Yeah these ICs, when going for clocks over 2000 like the timings to be tRCD=tRP+1=CAS+2


Great feedback and a good rule of thumb! Our mentality for the max OC was a "safe" 24/7 OC for a more typical enthusiast who likes to push without much added risk of damage, so we limited the voltage to 1.7V, I'll try a bit higher and see where it takes us!

Have a great day/weekend!
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-27 08:14
My mistake, these actually use Hynix MFR 4Gb ICs, but they like the same kind of timings as their smaller-density siblings the 2Gb CFR chips.
 
 
# gene396302 2012-10-28 08:27
Can you put this on a laptop, it looks like a laptop memory.
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-28 17:13
Quoting gene396302:
Can you put this on a laptop, it looks like a laptop memory.


These are full-sized DIMMs, so they will not fit in a laptop. They appear more square because of the large-profile heatsinks.