Kingston Predator 16GB (2x8GB) 1866 MHz DDR3 RAM/Memory Kit Review (KHX18C9T2K2/16X) - Benchmarks - SiSoft Sandra

SiSoft Sandra

SiSoftware's Sandra is another enthusiast utility suite which features a wide array of benchmarking capabilities, hardware monitoring, hardware information, diagnostics, and reporting capabilities for stability and configuration testing.  Its benchmarking capabilities extend to nearly every component of your computer, including the entire system, the exception being dedicated graphics benchmarking.  It also generates graphics which compare products for their aggregated performances including efficiency and price, which can be a powerful tool in itself and gives you an idea of where your system falls.  We'll be using its memory benchmarking tools to verify our AIDA64 results, and provide a separate basis of comparison with a different piece of testing software.

 

sandraband1

sandralat

sandacache

 

Sandra's results point toward the same trends as AIDA's: nearly-linear speed increases with clock speed (with a hit taken for reduced timings).  Memory bandwidth saw a healthy 20% increase, again at rated specs with only a single change needed in the BIOS, which is really what you're paying for in the 1866 MHz version of the kit.   Maxxing out the sticks yields an additional 6.5% increase over XMP settings, which is certainly going to make a smaller difference, especially considering the voltage/heat increase needed to get there.

 

While the typical user probably won't see much of a performance gain between the rated XMP setting and the overclocked 2133 MHz clock speed, certain calculation-intensive programs might see minutes shaved off an operation time, which can add up to be a pretty significant difference, which is where specialty kits like the Predator will find their best homes.

You have no rights to post comments

Comments   

 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 08:21
These sticks are based on Hynix CFR 2Gb ICs and should have way more headroom, at least DDR3-2400 11-13-12.
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-26 08:28
Quoting Sabishii Hito:
These sticks are based on Hynix CFR 2Gb ICs and should have way more headroom, at least DDR3-2400 11-13-12.


Even the best chips down have some "down-binned" parts come off the line for the lower frequency kits. But appreciate the feedback, and I'll give it another shot for you (we were unsuccessful through several hours of trial-and-error through seemingly endless timing combinations at 2400 MHz). It is very possible we have one unlucky DIMM holding the kit back. Appreciate it and we will report back if we get something to stick this time! These also deserve a discussion of the Hynix chips, so thanks for that as well.
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 11:04
Hmm, those buggers might need some more volts slapped in 'em! Although Hynix doesn't seem to scale much over 1.75v
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-26 12:21
Yeah these ICs, when going for clocks over 2000 like the timings to be tRCD=tRP+1=CAS+ 2
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-26 12:28
Quoting Sabishii Hito:
Yeah these ICs, when going for clocks over 2000 like the timings to be tRCD=tRP+1=CAS+2


Great feedback and a good rule of thumb! Our mentality for the max OC was a "safe" 24/7 OC for a more typical enthusiast who likes to push without much added risk of damage, so we limited the voltage to 1.7V, I'll try a bit higher and see where it takes us!

Have a great day/weekend!
 
 
# Sabishii Hito 2012-10-27 08:14
My mistake, these actually use Hynix MFR 4Gb ICs, but they like the same kind of timings as their smaller-density siblings the 2Gb CFR chips.
 
 
# gene396302 2012-10-28 08:27
Can you put this on a laptop, it looks like a laptop memory.
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-28 17:13
Quoting gene396302:
Can you put this on a laptop, it looks like a laptop memory.


These are full-sized DIMMs, so they will not fit in a laptop. They appear more square because of the large-profile heatsinks.