NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Review

Test Setup


CPU: Intel i5-3570K

Thermal Paste:  Noctua NT-H1

CPU Cooler:  Cooler Master TPC 812

Motherboard: Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H

RAM: 2x4GB Patriot Viper Xtreme II 1600MHz DDR3

OS HDD: Patriot Pyro 60GB SSD

Secondary HDD: Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB SSD

OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit

 

Temps and Voltages

Even with a single fan and simple heatsink, the GTX 650 Ti maxxed at a relatively cool 52°C at only 23% fan speed.  It's essentially whisper quiet, and we're excited to see the near-silent solutions OEMs will equip the GTX 650 Ti with.  At full load, the GTX 650 Ti pulled 1.062V, which is quite low, even for Kepler GPUs.

 

Overclocking


Since we are testing a reference card and not one from a 3rd party manufacturer, detailed overclocking results likely won't reflect performance from a "normal" chip.  Our sample could be hand-picked off the line for OC potential or other similar criteria.  Additionally, the reference cooling system likely won't be representative of most GTX 650 Ti you'll be able to buy, so differing thermal performance also comes into play.  As such, we'll be saving overclocking on the GTX 650 Ti for actual retail cards, which will be more representative of actual consumer performance.  From our quick OC tests, we expect to see the GTX 650 Ti have quite a decent amount of overclocking headroom, making that much more out of your 150 hard-earned dollars.

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Comments   

 
# three 2012-10-19 12:10
did you miss something? hell yah!
remember how 9800gt is a c2d era card?
now compare gtx 650ti to it on an [email protected] and we have something of a GPU upgrade advise here.
 
 
# Evan 2012-10-19 12:15
Quote:
did you miss something? hell yah!
remember how 9800gt is a c2d era card?
now compare gtx 650ti to it on an [email protected] and we have something of a GPU upgrade advise here.
I see where you are coming from, but most games today are exceedingly GPU-dependent, and you could possibly make the argument that the upgrade would be even more pronounced because the GPU would make up a greater percentage of the overall "horsepower" assuming the C2D doesn't create a blatant bottleneck. Of course if it did, you're point is very pertinent because the upgrade would require a new chipset.

Thanks for the input and perspective!
 
 
# three 2012-10-19 12:21
another thing to keep in mind is that 9800gt is only 512mb and is not a 1080p GPU and therefore should not be tested at higher than 1050p resolutions.
that and use quad or c2d OCed cpu to pit it against gtx 650ti for more accurate comparison results.