Cooler Master TPC 812 Vertical Vapor Chamber CPU Cooler Review - Testing

Test System:

CPU: Intel i5-2500K

Thermal Paste: Noctua NT-H1

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z77-V Pro

RAM: 2x4GB Patriot Viper Xtreme II 1600MHz DDR3

GPU: ASUS GTX 560Ti 448 Core

OS HDD: Patriot Pyro 60GB SSD

Secondary HDD: Patriot Wildfire 120GB SSD

 

Idle Testing

For idle testing, we booted up the system, allowed the CPU to stabilized at ~0% usage, and then tested for at least 10 minutes, and we used RealTemp to record the CPU temperatures once the temperatures were stable.  We tested two different conditions of the i5-2500K, the first is completely stock and default settings, and the second is overclocked to 3.8GHz and 1.26V. The single temperature recorded was the average between the four cores.

Idle-temps

OC-Idle-temps

 

Load Testing

For our load tests, we used Prime95 to stress the CPU to 100%, and let it run that way until the temperatures became stable (allowing 15 minutes minimum), and then used RealTemp to record the temperatures.  We tested two different conditions of the i5-2500K, the first is completely stock and default settings, and the second is overclocked to 3.8GHz and 1.26V.  The single value recorded is the average temperature of the four cores.

Stock-load-temps

OC-Load-temps

 

Results

We see very strong performance from the TPC 812 up against the monstrous Titan Fenrir Siberia and the comparably-sized Arctic Freezer i-30.  What we see is that the performance gap widens as we increase our power draw (the heat output), due to the Vertical Vapor Chambers beginning to be utilized.  At lower loads, the heatpipes are capable of handling the heat, and the Vertical Vapor Chambers don't see much heat to wick away.  Think of it as an extra lane for traffic alongside a freeway which acts as overflow, when the freeway is flowing smooth because it doesn't have a large vehicle load, the standby lane doesn't receive much traffic, and doesn't help much either.  What this says is that when other coolers begin to struggle, and their temps begin to climb quickly as you increase your overclock because the heatpipes are saturated, the temperatures when using TPC 812 will rise much shallower as the extra "lane" created by the Vertical Vapor Chambers begins to absorb the extra loading.

 

The TPC 812 bests the Arctic Freezer i30 by 2.5 degrees Celsius under overclocked loads, which is 5 percent better, which certainly not insignificant, especially when pushing your clocks into the 4+ GHz range.

 

We will also be testing the TPC 812 on our i7-3930K where we will push the coolers to high temperatures, and see how this thermal curve develops as we push the TPC 812 closer to its rated 300W TDP.  We will update the review once we've completed all of our Sandy Bridge-E testing.

 

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Comments   

 
# chengsta 2012-05-06 18:50
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.
 
 
# Inferno 2012-05-06 19:49
Quoting chengsta:
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.


This is certainly a good point, but since it's a vapor, the technology should still help promote convection. Although it's ideal operation would certainly be with the vapor chambers pointed upward, it should still be fairly effective, as temperature differences (and thus density differences) in the vapor should still promote vapor movement within the chamber; increasing heat flow.

This is a great observation, and not sure myself how it didn't occur to me before this point. I am sure that it's most effective in a test-bench configuration.