Cooler Master TPC 812 Vertical Vapor Chamber CPU Cooler Review - A Closer Look


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The TPC 812 brings alot to the table, and is sized similarly to many mid-range and enthusiast coolers, but is much smaller than dual-tower configurations.  Cooler Master ships a single 120mm fan to wick heat away from the heatsink fins, and includes the necessary brackets to quickly mount another fan for a push-pull configuration.  The side brackets are designed to prevent spillage over the sides of the fan chassis, and helps focus the flow through the fins, improving airflow through the fins.

 

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The fins were designed to optimize air pressure through the fins, and one of the design features which is enabling in this regard are the grooves on the faces which the fans mount on.  The fans are also slightly spaced from the edge of the fins to prevent flow stagnation which hinders overall airflow, and subsequently the conductive efficiency of the heatsink.  Cooler Master has added a subtle touch to top out the visible top fin, by printing their insignia in a light grey color, and the tops of the heatpipes and vapor chambers are capped by chrome-colored plastic.

 

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The TPC 812 has a traditional 6-heatpipe design which each part ways to each side of the fin stack, and here we can see the star of the show:  Cooler Master's Vertical Vapor Chambers.  The vertical vapor chambers are rather blade-like, which yields a significant advantage, which is contact surface area with both the airflow between the fins, and with the fins themselves.  This results in more rapid heat dissipation and greater overall thermal capacity.  The bladed shape also impedes the airflow less, and doesn't create substantial flow vortices that circular heatpipes do, which contribute to noise and pressure fluctuations.  The overall result is greater thermal capacity enabled by the Vertical Vapor Chambers, with little to no noise or airflow tradeoffs.

 

The contact base is a solid copper block with nickel plating and is machine polished to a smooth, mirror-like finish.  The base is thicker than many coolers to accommodate the Vertical Vapor Chambers stacked ontop of the heatpipes.

 

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Cooler Master ships a 120mm fan with an "S" blade design which has shown from experience to push a lot of air while remaining quiet.  The fan is capable of a relatively high 2400RPM for demanding overclocking applications, and it may be limited to 1600RPM with an included 4-pin adapter to ensure it remains quiet.  A holographic sticker adds a splash of eye-catching styling which looks very neat when it's spinning.  When the fan is run at full speed, it is relatively loud, and can be clearly identified over other system fans when they're turned up to full speed.  When using an "auto" fan setting, it's pleasantly quiet and is relatively unnoticeable over the other fans.

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# chengsta 2012-05-06 18:50
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.
 
 
# Inferno 2012-05-06 19:49
Quoting chengsta:
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.


This is certainly a good point, but since it's a vapor, the technology should still help promote convection. Although it's ideal operation would certainly be with the vapor chambers pointed upward, it should still be fairly effective, as temperature differences (and thus density differences) in the vapor should still promote vapor movement within the chamber; increasing heat flow.

This is a great observation, and not sure myself how it didn't occur to me before this point. I am sure that it's most effective in a test-bench configuration.