Cooler Master TPC 812 Vertical Vapor Chamber CPU Cooler Review

tpc-812

One of Cooler Master's primary markets is centered around industrial cooling solutions, which gave birth to their vapor chamber cooling technology.  The TPC 812 is Cooler Master's first cooler to incorporate this cooling technology into a mainstream enthusiast cooler.  With a total rated heat dissipation of 300W, and priced squarely into the meat of the enthusiast cooler market, the TPC 812 is prepared to make a splash.

 

Introduction

The first ever CPU heatsink to utilize vertical vapor chamber cooling and combine it with heat pipe technology, TPC 812 is prepared to handle the massive heat generated by overclocking and benchmarking. Vertical vapor chamber working in tandem with heat pipes and a specialized heatsink and fin design allow the TPC 812 to outperform the competition.

 

Features

1. The TPC 812 uses 2 separate cooling technologies to transfer heat – heat pipes and vertical vapor chambers.
2. Ready for overclocking, benchmarking and silent cooling.
3. The first-ever CPU heatsink to use vertical vapor chamber technology.
4. 100% pure polished copper base – combined with improved soldering technologies for the best thermal transfer.
5. Special fin design – heatsink receives concentrated cold airflow.
6. Improved air pressure design and fan mounting system.

 

Specifications

Model RR-T812-24PK-R1
CPU Socket Intel Socket:
LGA 2011 / 1366 / 1156 / 1155 / 775 *

AMD Socket:
FM1 / AM3+ / AM3 / AM2+ / AM2
CPU Support Intel:
Core™ i7 Extreme / Core™ i7 / Core™ i5 / Core™ i3 / Core™2 Extreme / Core™2 Quad / Core™2 Duo / Pentium / Celeron

AMD:
FX-Series / A-Series / Phenom™ II X4 / Phenom™ II X3 / Phenom™ II X2 / Phenom™ X4 / Phenom™ X3 / Athlon™ II X4 / Athlon™ II X3 / Athlon™ II X2 / Athlon™ X2 / Athlon™ / Sempron™
Dimension 138 x 103 x 163mm (5.4 x 4.1 x 6.4 in)
Heat Sink Dimensions 134 x 74 x 158 mm (5.3 x 2.9 x 6.2 in)
Heat Sink Material Copper Base / 2 Vapor Chambers
6 Heatpipes / Aluminum Fins
Heat Sink Weight 826g (1.83 lb)
Heat Pipes Dimensions ø6mm
Fan Dimension 120 x 120 x 25mm (4.7 x 4.7 x 1 in)
Fan Speed 600 – 2,400 RPM (PWM) ± 10%
(1,600 RPM with Silent Mode Adapter)
Fan Airflow 19.17 - 86.15 CFM ± 10%
(59.54 CFM @ 1600RPM)
Fan Air Pressure 0.31 – 4.16 mm H2O ± 10%
(1.99mm H2O @ 1600RPM)
Fan Life Expectancy 40,000 hrs
Fan Noise Level (dB-A) 19 - 40 dBA
Bearing Type Long Life Sleeve Bearing
Connector 4-Pin
Fan Rated Voltage 12 VDC
Fan Rated Current 0.2A
Power consumption 2.4W
Fan Weight 152g (0.34 lb)
Notice * Supplied accessories may differ by country or area. Please check with your local distributor for further details.
Warranty 2 years

UPC Code

884102015229

 

Packaging

DSC 1204DSC 1205

DSC 1206

The TPC 812 comes neatly packed in a dark grey and black boxe, with Cooler Master's purple coloring accenting the edges, while the features and specs are detailed on each face of the box.  In addition to the cooler, a quick reference and multilingual installation guide, a small tube of thermal paste, two additonal fan mounting brackets, and all necessary hardware for universal mounting compatibility (even LGA 2011) are included.

You have no rights to post comments

Comments   

 
# chengsta 2012-05-06 18:50
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.
 
 
# Inferno 2012-05-06 19:49
Quoting chengsta:
okay, something just hit me about this fan. While vapor cooling technology is cool and all... I don't think it'll function as intended because I just realized that it will be on its SIDE. All the illustrations have it standing upright, with the vapor going upwards - not sideways.


This is certainly a good point, but since it's a vapor, the technology should still help promote convection. Although it's ideal operation would certainly be with the vapor chambers pointed upward, it should still be fairly effective, as temperature differences (and thus density differences) in the vapor should still promote vapor movement within the chamber; increasing heat flow.

This is a great observation, and not sure myself how it didn't occur to me before this point. I am sure that it's most effective in a test-bench configuration.